Calls for Manuscripts

Upcoming Language Arts Themes

Note: The final issue from the current editorial team—Wanda Brooks, Jonda McNair, and Kelly Wissman—will appear in July 2021. The incoming editorial team of Rick Coppola, Sandra L. Osorio, and Rebecca Woodard offers the following calls for manuscripts.


September 2021: Antiracist Pedagogies

Submission Deadline: October 1, 2020
For the inaugural issue of the incoming editorial team, we seek Feature Article and Perspectives on Practice submissions that explore antiracist pedagogies in elementary classrooms. Such pedagogies acknowledge the persistence of structural racism and inequality in schooling, and also attempt to counteract them. Some questions to consider include: How are teachers successfully “transform[ing] legacies of colonization” in schools (McCarty & Lee, 2014, p. 103), and challenging racism in/through ELA curriculum and instructional practices? How do educators, children, and families utilize abolitionist tactics such as protesting and boycotts (Love, 2019) to resist harmful practices in schools? How are educators supporting antiracist work with white children and families? How might language arts teachers and researchers be accountable to the needs of the communities they serve? How do teachers center and sustain the multiple languages and cultures of their students in their curriculum? Join us in crafting an issue that explores the necessity of imagining and working toward a different educational future.

Love, B. L. (2019). We want to do more than survive: Abolitionist teaching and the pursuit of educational freedom. Beacon Press.

McCarty, T. L., & Lee, T. S. (2014). Critical culturally sustaining/revitalizing pedagogy and Indigenous education sovereignty. Harvard Educational Review, 84(1), 101–124.


November 2021: Viewpoints & Visions

Submission Deadline: November 1, 2020
For this unthemed issue, we invite Feature Article and Perspectives on Practice submissions that offer a variety of viewpoints and visions related to language arts across multiple settings and modalities. What topics, concerns, or issues do you think are important to today’s readers of Language Arts? How are language arts teachers and researchers responding to contemporary societal issues and their influence on educational spaces? What kinds of theoretical lenses have you applied to your inquiry work to increase our collective understandings of language arts instruction; furthermore, how are these inquiries informing and expanding theoretical frameworks? How are children’s multiple languages and cultures being sustained across learning spaces, including classrooms, homes, and community settings? How are educators, researchers, families, and children working together to enact critical pedagogies that are humanizing and transformative? These are just a few of the many questions that can be explored in this issue. Join us in crafting an assortment of articles that helps to expand our viewpoints and visions about children and the language arts.


January 2022: Fostering Joy & Recognizing Brilliance
Submission Deadline: December 1, 2020
For this issue, we seek Feature Articles and Perspectives on Practice submissions that explore joy in teaching and learning, and the brilliance of children. We seek submissions about the joyful and brilliant engagements of children and youth as they read, write, speak, and explore their worlds. Some questions to consider include: How do language arts educators center joy and love in their constant work for justice? How can pre- and inservice teachers honor the brilliance of all children, particularly those that identify as Black, Indigenous, and People of Color? How might language arts educators design classroom learning environments that foster joy for all students? How can Black and Brown youths’ intellectual and cultural histories inform and reshape our schools and classrooms (see Muhammad, 2019)? How do educators foster Black joy, and support children to signal “to the world that your darkness is what makes you strong and beautiful” (Love, 2019, p.120)? Join us in crafting an issue that centers joy and highlights children’s brilliance in early childhood and elementary spaces.

Love, B. L. (2019). We want to do more than survive: Abolitionist teaching and the pursuit of educational freedom. Beacon Press.

Muhammad, G. (2019). Cultivating genius: An equity framework for culturally and historically responsive literacy. Scholastic.


March 2022: Learning on the Move

Submission Deadline: January 15, 2021

Learning on the Move is a framework for study and design (Marin et al., 2020) that draws across different fields with interests in learning across space, place, and time. Learning on the Move studies “examine movement and transformation across various spatial and temporal dimensions—home, community and school, walking and driving to and from school, or on nature walks—focusing on everyday routines, tool-mediated activity, relationships, and human-nature relations” (Gutiérrez, 2020). In this issue considering Learning on the Move, we ask questions such as How do children learn on the move—across boundaries, spaces, and time? How has online teaching challenged educators’ understandings of learning, belonging, and/or school? How can attention to relationships between culture and nature (see Bang et al., 2014) encourage “opportunities to rethink people’s relationships to land, water, neighborhoods, and space” (Gutiérrez, 2020)? How do children’s movements across national borders shape their literacy and language practices, as well as their identities? How might our pedagogies better attend to mobility, space, place, and time? Join us in exploring these issues and others as we consider children’s literacy and language learning on the move.

Bang, M., Curley, L., Kessel, A., Marin, A., Suzukovich, E. S., III, & Strack, G. (2014). Muskrat theories, tobacco in the streets, and living Chicago as Indigenous land. Environmental Education Research, 20(1), 37–55. https://doi.org/10.1080/13504622.2013.865113

Gutiérrez, K. D. (2020). When learning as movement meets Learning on the Move. Cognition and Instruction, 38(3), 427–433.

Marin, A., Taylor, K. H., Shapiro, B. R., & Hall, R. (2020). Why Learning on the Move: Intersecting research pathways for mobility, learning and teaching. Cognition and Instruction, 38(3), 265–280. https://doi.org/10.1080/07370008.2020.1769100


May 2022: Viewpoints and Visions

Submission Deadline: February 1, 2021

For this unthemed issue, we invite Feature Article and Perspectives on Practice submissions that offer a variety of viewpoints and visions related to language arts across multiple settings and modalities. What topics, concerns, or issues do you think are important to today’s readers of Language Arts? How are language arts teachers and researchers responding to contemporary societal issues and their influence on educational spaces? What kinds of theoretical lenses have you applied to your inquiry work to increase our collective understandings of language arts instruction; furthermore, how are these inquiries informing and expanding theoretical frameworks? How are children’s multiple languages and cultures being sustained across learning spaces, including classrooms, homes, and community settings? How are educators, researchers, families, and children working together to enact critical pedagogies that are humanizing and transformative? These are just a few of the many questions that can be explored in this issue. Join us in crafting an assortment of articles that helps to expand our viewpoints and visions about children and the language arts.


July 2022: Learning with and in Community

Submission Deadline: April 15, 2021

For this issue, we invite Feature Articles and Perspective on Practice submissions that foreground a commitment to teaching and learning in children’s communities. Things we’re wondering about include the following: How are elementary and middle grades educators working with community partners, families, and children to imagine and enact different educational futures? In what ways are educators encouraging participatory democracy and political engagement with/in communities? What spaces have language arts teachers cultivated to empower civic agency? What transformative outcomes have emerged when engaging children with community-based or youth-led participatory action research frameworks? How has collaborating with families and communities brought greater awareness to teachers regarding aspects of their own practice? How are teachers centering the goals and knowledge(s) of families and communities in their practice? How are educators and researchers grappling with the social and political complexity that undergirds any community-based youth work, including interrogating systems of oppression and other co-optive forces? We look forward to sharing lessons learned from language arts teaching committed to children’s communities.


September 2022: Lessons Learned from Online and Blended Schooling

Submission Deadline: June 15, 2021

For this issue, we seek Feature Articles and Perspectives on Practice submissions that explore lessons learned from online and blended schooling during the COVID-19 pandemic, which has altered the educational landscape in profound ways, and illuminated the divides that exist along geographic, socioeconomic, and racial continuums. We invite writers to grapple with the following questions: What consequences have the rapid and unplanned movement to online and blended learning had on children’s learning and families’ learning and growth? How can online platforms, nearly all of which are connected to corporate interests and efforts to profit, be leveraged to support younger learners? What aspects of online learning platforms should be interrogated by teachers and administrators working to support children and families? How can the educators’ differentiated, professional development needs related to online teaching be addressed? What lessons from online learning can inform future in-person teaching and learning? What possibilities have opened up to be critical of problematic traditional approaches to learning and to catalyze systemic change? What innovative ways did educators partner with families, support wellness and care during this time of trauma, and/or foster collaboration? While the sudden shift to online schooling has offered many challenges to all educators and families, we are especially interested in highlighting innovative and meaningful teaching that sought to prepare youth to be critically engaged, collaborative, and adaptable to our rapidly changing reality.