Calls for Manuscripts - NCTE

Calls for Manuscripts

Upcoming Language Arts Themes

Editors Rick Coppola, Sandra L. Osorio, and Rebecca Woodard offer the following calls for manuscripts. Questions for the editors may be directed to NCTE.LAjournal@gmail.com. All articles should be submitted through the Editorial Manager site.

 

Submission deadline: April 15, 2022

For this unthemed issue, we invite Feature Article and Perspectives on Practice submissions that offer a variety of viewpoints and visions related to language arts across multiple settings and modalities. What topics, concerns, or issues do you think are important to today’s readers of Language Arts? What kinds of theoretical lenses have you applied to your inquiry work to increase our collective understanding of language arts instruction? How does your research illustrate the range of ways in which young people are engaged with the language arts? What trends do you see in the field of language arts? What innovative literacy practices do you see in the diverse spaces of classrooms and community settings? Within a digital age, how are our understandings of children’s literature, writing instruction, and literacy learning shifting? These are just a few of the many questions that can be explored in this issue. Join us in crafting an assortment of articles that helps to expand our viewpoints and visions about language arts.

Submission deadline: June 15, 2022

For this editorial team’s inaugural issue in September 2021, we focused on the theme of antiracist pedagogies in elementary classrooms, setting an intention to return to it midway through and at the end of our editorial term. For our return to the theme of antiracist pedagogies, we’re still interested in pedagogies that acknowledge the persistence of structural racism and inequality in schooling as well as attempts to counteract them. This time, though, we’d like to focus specifically on pedagogies that center Blackness in pedagogy and practice. Some questions to consider include: How are elementary teachers learning from and centering the brilliance of Black children and communities in their pedagogies? How are educators partnering with community organizations and/or families to transform schools and classrooms into pro-Black spaces? How do teachers center and sustain the languages and cultures of Black students in their curriculum? In what ways are you doing the work of contributing to emancipatory and liberatory outcomes for Black boys and girls in schools? Join us in this ongoing dialogue that explores the necessity of imagining and working toward a different educational future.

Submission deadline: August 15, 2022

For this unthemed issue, we invite Feature Article and Perspectives on Practice submissions that offer a variety of viewpoints and visions related to language arts across multiple settings and modalities. What topics, concerns, or issues do you think are important to today’s readers of Language Arts? What kinds of theoretical lenses have you applied to your inquiry work to increase our collective understandings of language arts instruction? How does your research illustrate the range of ways in which young people are engaged with the language arts? What trends do you see in the field of language arts? What innovative literacy practices do you see in the diverse spaces of classrooms and community settings? Within a digital age, how are our understandings of children’s literature, writing instruction, and literacy learning shifting? These are just a few of the many questions that can be explored in this issue. Join us in crafting an assortment of articles that helps to expand our viewpoints and visions about language arts.

Submission deadline: October 15, 2022

Disability studies in education (DSE) is an interdisciplinary area of scholarship that situates “cognitive, embodied, and communicative differences as part of the natural spectrum of human diversity” (Collins et al., 2018, p. 114). It attends to the social construction of ability in schools and how differences are sometimes constructed as disabilities. DSE “shifts our professional gaze from identifying what is ‘wrong’ with individual students to what we have power to change in the instructional environment to facilitate the full participation of each student” (Collins et al., 2018, p. 114). Collins and Ferri (2016) have articulated a cross-pollination of literacy teaching and DSE, where they suggest three habits of mind: (1) start with the position that everyone in the classroom community belongs, and the teacher’s job is to support everyone’s meaningful participation; (2) presume competence, assuming that “each learner has something valuable to contribute and wants to participate” (p. 4); and (3) recognize that struggle is located in interactions between learners and the learning environment. In this issue, we’re interested in explorations of inclusive elementary classrooms. We’re wondering: How is dis/ability constructed in elementary literacy classrooms? How do teachers resist labeling and sorting practices in literacy instruction? How do ability, race, and gender intersect in our classroom practices and pedagogies? How do we strive—and struggle—to cultivate inclusive classrooms that honor differences?

Collins, K., & Ferri, B. (2016). Literacy education and disability studies: Reenvisioning struggling students. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 60( 1), 7–12. https://doi.org/10.1002/jaal.552

Collins, K. M., Wagner, M. O., & Meadows, J. (2018). Every story matters: Disability studies in the literacy classroom. Language Arts, 96(2), 114–19.

Submission deadline: January 5, 2023

For this unthemed issue, we invite Feature Article and Perspectives on Practice submissions that offer a variety of viewpoints and visions related to language arts across multiple settings and modalities. What topics, concerns, or issues do you think are important to today’s readers of Language Arts? What kinds of theoretical lenses have you applied to your inquiry work to increase our collective understandings of language arts instruction? How does your research illustrate the range of ways in which young people are engaged with the language arts? What trends do you see in the field of language arts? What innovative literacy practices do you see in the diverse spaces of classrooms and community settings? Within a digital age, how are our understandings of children’s literature, writing instruction, and literacy learning shifting? These are just a few of the many questions that can be explored in this issue. Join us in crafting an assortment of articles that helps to expand our viewpoints and visions about language arts.

Submission deadline: February 15, 2023

There has been a dramatic rise in hate crimes against Asian Americans during the COVID-19 pandemic. While Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) have “long struggled for belonging, safety, and equity in the United States . . . this struggle has reached a new level.” The editors’ home state, Illinois, has recently signed one of the first laws to mandate teaching Asian American history in schools. For this issue, we seek Feature Articles and Perspectives on Practice submissions that explore AAPI communities, voices, and experiences, particularly related to elementary schooling. Some questions to consider include: How are elementary teachers decentering whiteness in their curriculum on a daily basis, including through the use of AAPI literature? How are educators honoring and uplifting the voices, experiences, languages, and stories of AAPI communities as a classroom norm? How do educators teach about the diversity, history, and contributions to the world’s knowledge from AAPI communities? How do teachers support students to be critically conscious and act against Asian American hate? How are educators—and children—fostering solidarity with AAPI communities and across communities of color? Join us in crafting an issue that honors AAPI communities, voices, and experiences.

Submission deadline: April 15, 2023

The increased polarization felt across political, societal, and moral dimensions has deeply affected our collective ability to engage in civic reasoning and discourse. Schools and other places of learning have taken a central role in this contentious debate. A recent report by Lee et al. with the National Academy of Education (2021) poses the following question: “How [can we], at multiple levels of society, strive to work together to address our collective needs”? For this issue, we seek Feature Articles and Perspectives on Practice submissions that explore how you are preparing students with developmentally appropriate skills, practices, and dispositions to be fully informed and engaged citizens. Questions we’re thinking about include: How are you supporting students in sorting through and evaluating endless amounts of digital information? What spaces are you creating for students to understand multiple viewpoints and dialogue across differences in important societal issues (e.g., racism, climate change, the pandemic, economic disparity, etc.)? What does it mean to prepare students for democratic citizenship during these times? What sorts of literacies can support civic reasoning and discourse? What responsibility do we share across content areas to prepare young people to be fully engaged and informed citizens of their community and the larger world?

Lee, C. D., White, G., & Dong, D. (Eds.). (2021). Executive summary. Educating for Civic Reasoning and Discourse, Committee on Civic Reasoning and Discourse. Washington, DC: National Academy of Education.

May 2023: Reflections on Normalizing Struggle

No longer accepting submissions

As educators, we know that the struggle is, at times, all too real. Despite valiant attempts to string together successful lessons, units, and experiences, there are times when we fall short. For this issue, we ask you to draw on the power of narrative (e.g., letter, personal essay, editorial, poetry, etc.) and lean into your struggle(s) as a way to normalize the challenges inherent in the work of teaching and learning. Perhaps you have found yourself in one of the following situations: Have you missed the opportunity to apprehend an important lesson in the moment when it was happening? Have you ever felt silenced in an attempt to speak up and advocate for a different path when something went amiss? Have you avoided or felt ill-equipped to recognize and/or address the magnitude of something heavy? Have you missed an opportunity to validate and honor the fullness of the culture and identity affiliations of your students? Have you ever been made to feel invisible by a colleague or administrator? We believe there is much to learn from these moments when we struggle to stay on course and grapple with the myriad commitments we need to juggle professionally and personally. We want to cultivate a space where those stories can be shared and become teachable moments for our community of educators. Please note that for this issue, in addition to Feature Articles (6,500 words maximum) and Perspectives on Practice submissions (1,500 words maximum), we will accept a third submission type called Alternative Format (2,000 words), which may include letters (e.g., to self, to young teachers, to administrators, to children or families), personal essays, editorials, poetry, etc.


January 2023: Honoring and Sustaining Children’s Languages

No longer accepting submissions
In this issue, we invite Feature Articles and Perspectives on Practice submissions related to the linguistic resources of children. We want to know about instructional practices that welcome the use of multiple languages and dialects in the classroom, encourage connections to family and community, as well as ways of assessing all the linguistic resources of children through asset-oriented lenses. What do these practices look like both inside and outside the classroom? How is translanguaging embraced and encouraged in your ELA instruction? What are some of the language choices made in both monolingual and multilingual spaces? How do teachers successfully position historically marginalized language varieties, like Black language, as a valuable intellectual resource? How do teachers draw on students’ funds of knowledge to challenge deficit notions of language and literacy? What actions are taken to normalize multilingualism both at the curricular and policy levels? In what ways might teachers honor and sustain children’s home languages even when they don’t speak that particular language? How do multilingual teachers draw on their own linguistic resources in instruction? How are preservice teachers learning to support their future students to fully participate in an increasingly multilingual and multicultural world? Please join us in crafting an issue that expands our understandings of the linguistic resources that children bring into the classroom.


March 2023: Supporting Science Literacies

No longer accepting submissions
Science education is often neglected in elementary teaching, while reading and math are prioritized. In this issue, we are interested in teaching and learning at the intersection of literacy and science. We are wondering: How are teachers supporting children’s curiosity about the natural and social world? How are they engaging young children and youth in inquiry and investigations about their neighborhoods, environments, and the world? How are children exploring issues at the intersection of science and justice? How are urgent scientific issues, such as climate change, being addressed in elementary classrooms? What literacy practices are being supported through scientific inquiry? Join us in creating an issue that explores these pressing interdisciplinary issues.


November 2022: Viewpoints & Visions

No longer accepting submissions
For this unthemed issue, we invite Feature Article and Perspectives on Practice submissions that offer a variety of viewpoints and visions related to language arts across multiple settings and modalities. What topics, concerns, or issues do you think are important to today’s readers of Language Arts? What kinds of theoretical lenses have you applied to your inquiry work to increase our collective understandings of language arts instruction? How does your research illustrate the range of ways in which young people are engaged with the language arts? What trends do you see in the field of language arts? What innovative literacy practices do you see in the diverse spaces of classrooms and community settings? Within a digital age, how are our understandings of children’s literature, writing instruction, and literacy learning shifting? These are just a few of the many questions that can be explored in this issue. Join us in crafting an assortment of articles that helps to expand our viewpoints and visions about language arts.


September 2022: Lessons Learned from Online and Blended Schooling

No longer accepting submissions
For this issue, we seek Feature Articles and Perspectives on Practice submissions that explore lessons learned from online and blended schooling during the COVID-19 pandemic, which has altered the educational landscape in profound ways, and illuminated the divides that exist along geographic, socioeconomic, and racial continuums. We invite writers to grapple with the following questions: What consequences have the rapid and unplanned movement to online and blended learning had on children’s learning and families’ learning and growth? How can online platforms, nearly all of which are connected to corporate interests and efforts to profit, be leveraged to support younger learners? What aspects of online learning platforms should be interrogated by teachers and administrators working to support children and families? How can the educators’ differentiated, professional development needs related to online teaching be addressed? What lessons from online learning can inform future in-person teaching and learning? What possibilities have opened up to be critical of problematic traditional approaches to learning and to catalyze systemic change? What innovative ways did educators partner with families, support wellness and care during this time of trauma, and/or foster collaboration? While the sudden shift to online schooling has offered many challenges to all educators and families, we are especially interested in highlighting innovative and meaningful teaching that sought to prepare youth to be critically engaged, collaborative, and adaptable to our rapidly changing reality.