Calls for Manuscripts - NCTE

Calls for Manuscripts

Upcoming Language Arts Themes

Editors Rick Coppola, Sandra L. Osorio, and Rebecca Woodard offer the following calls for manuscripts. Questions for the editors may be directed to NCTE.LAjournal@gmail.com. All articles should be submitted through the Editorial Manager site.


May 2023: Reflections on Normalizing Struggle

Submission deadline: February 15, 2022
As educators, we know that the struggle is, at times, all too real. Despite valiant attempts to string together successful lessons, units, and experiences, there are times when we fall short. For this issue, we ask you to draw on the power of narrative (e.g., letter, personal essay, editorial, poetry, etc.) and lean into your struggle(s) as a way to normalize the challenges inherent in the work of teaching and learning. Perhaps you have found yourself in one of the following situations: Have you missed the opportunity to apprehend an important lesson in the moment when it was happening? Have you ever felt silenced in an attempt to speak up and advocate for a different path when something went amiss? Have you avoided or felt ill-equipped to recognize and/or address the magnitude of something heavy? Have you missed an opportunity to validate and honor the fullness of the culture and identity affiliations of your students? Have you ever been made to feel invisible by a colleague or administrator? We believe there is much to learn from these moments when we struggle to stay on course and grapple with the myriad commitments we need to juggle professionally and personally. We want to cultivate a space where those stories can be shared and become teachable moments for our community of educators. Please note that for this issue, in addition to Feature Articles (6,500 words maximum) and Perspectives on Practice submissions (1,500 words maximum), we will accept a third submission type called Alternative Format (2,000 words), which may include letters (e.g., to self, to young teachers, to administrators, to children or families), personal essays, editorials, poetry, etc.


July 2023: Viewpoints & Visions

Submission deadline: April 15, 2022
For this unthemed issue, we invite Feature Article and Perspectives on Practice submissions that offer a variety of viewpoints and visions related to language arts across multiple settings and modalities. What topics, concerns, or issues do you think are important to today’s readers of Language Arts? What kinds of theoretical lenses have you applied to your inquiry work to increase our collective understanding of language arts instruction? How does your research illustrate the range of ways in which young people are engaged with the language arts? What trends do you see in the field of language arts? What innovative literacy practices do you see in the diverse spaces of classrooms and community settings? Within a digital age, how are our understandings of children’s literature, writing instruction, and literacy learning shifting? These are just a few of the many questions that can be explored in this issue. Join us in crafting an assortment of articles that helps to expand our viewpoints and visions about language arts.


Past Calls

January 2023: Honoring and Sustaining Children’s Languages

Submission deadline: No longer accepting submissions
In this issue, we invite Feature Articles and Perspectives on Practice submissions related to the linguistic resources of children. We want to know about instructional practices that welcome the use of multiple languages and dialects in the classroom, encourage connections to family and community, as well as ways of assessing all the linguistic resources of children through asset-oriented lenses. What do these practices look like both inside and outside the classroom? How is translanguaging embraced and encouraged in your ELA instruction? What are some of the language choices made in both monolingual and multilingual spaces? How do teachers successfully position historically marginalized language varieties, like Black language, as a valuable intellectual resource? How do teachers draw on students’ funds of knowledge to challenge deficit notions of language and literacy? What actions are taken to normalize multilingualism both at the curricular and policy levels? In what ways might teachers honor and sustain children’s home languages even when they don’t speak that particular language? How do multilingual teachers draw on their own linguistic resources in instruction? How are preservice teachers learning to support their future students to fully participate in an increasingly multilingual and multicultural world? Please join us in crafting an issue that expands our understandings of the linguistic resources that children bring into the classroom.


March 2023: Supporting Science Literacies

Submission deadline: No longer accepting submissions
Science education is often neglected in elementary teaching, while reading and math are prioritized. In this issue, we are interested in teaching and learning at the intersection of literacy and science. We are wondering: How are teachers supporting children’s curiosity about the natural and social world? How are they engaging young children and youth in inquiry and investigations about their neighborhoods, environments, and the world? How are children exploring issues at the intersection of science and justice? How are urgent scientific issues, such as climate change, being addressed in elementary classrooms? What literacy practices are being supported through scientific inquiry? Join us in creating an issue that explores these pressing interdisciplinary issues.


November 2022: Viewpoints & Visions

Submission deadline: No longer accepting submissions
For this unthemed issue, we invite Feature Article and Perspectives on Practice submissions that offer a variety of viewpoints and visions related to language arts across multiple settings and modalities. What topics, concerns, or issues do you think are important to today’s readers of Language Arts? What kinds of theoretical lenses have you applied to your inquiry work to increase our collective understandings of language arts instruction? How does your research illustrate the range of ways in which young people are engaged with the language arts? What trends do you see in the field of language arts? What innovative literacy practices do you see in the diverse spaces of classrooms and community settings? Within a digital age, how are our understandings of children’s literature, writing instruction, and literacy learning shifting? These are just a few of the many questions that can be explored in this issue. Join us in crafting an assortment of articles that helps to expand our viewpoints and visions about language arts.


September 2022: Lessons Learned from Online and Blended Schooling

Submission deadline: No longer accepting submissions
For this issue, we seek Feature Articles and Perspectives on Practice submissions that explore lessons learned from online and blended schooling during the COVID-19 pandemic, which has altered the educational landscape in profound ways, and illuminated the divides that exist along geographic, socioeconomic, and racial continuums. We invite writers to grapple with the following questions: What consequences have the rapid and unplanned movement to online and blended learning had on children’s learning and families’ learning and growth? How can online platforms, nearly all of which are connected to corporate interests and efforts to profit, be leveraged to support younger learners? What aspects of online learning platforms should be interrogated by teachers and administrators working to support children and families? How can the educators’ differentiated, professional development needs related to online teaching be addressed? What lessons from online learning can inform future in-person teaching and learning? What possibilities have opened up to be critical of problematic traditional approaches to learning and to catalyze systemic change? What innovative ways did educators partner with families, support wellness and care during this time of trauma, and/or foster collaboration? While the sudden shift to online schooling has offered many challenges to all educators and families, we are especially interested in highlighting innovative and meaningful teaching that sought to prepare youth to be critically engaged, collaborative, and adaptable to our rapidly changing reality.