Calls for Manuscripts

Upcoming Language Arts Themes


September 2021: Antiracist Pedagogies

Submission Deadline: October 1, 2020
For the inaugural issue of the incoming editorial team, we seek Feature Article and Perspectives on Practice submissions that explore antiracist pedagogies in elementary classrooms. Such pedagogies acknowledge the persistence of structural racism and inequality in schooling, and also attempt to counteract them. Some questions to consider include: How are teachers successfully “transform[ing] legacies of colonization” in schools (McCarty & Lee, 2014, p. 103), and challenging racism in/through ELA curriculum and instructional practices? How do educators, children, and families utilize abolitionist tactics such as protesting and boycotts (Love, 2019) to resist harmful practices in schools? How are educators supporting antiracist work with white children and families? How might language arts teachers and researchers be accountable to the needs of the communities they serve? How do teachers center and sustain the multiple languages and cultures of their students in their curriculum? Join us in crafting an issue that explores the necessity of imagining and working toward a different educational future.

Love, B. L. (2019). We want to do more than survive: Abolitionist teaching and the pursuit of educational freedom. Beacon Press.

McCarty, T. L., & Lee, T. S. (2014). Critical culturally sustaining/revitalizing pedagogy and Indigenous education sovereignty. Harvard Educational Review, 84(1), 101–124.


November 2021: Viewpoints & Visions

Submission Deadline: November 1, 2020
For this unthemed issue, we invite Feature Article and Perspectives on Practice submissions that offer a variety of viewpoints and visions related to language arts across multiple settings and modalities. What topics, concerns, or issues do you think are important to today’s readers of Language Arts? How are language arts teachers and researchers responding to contemporary societal issues and their influence on educational spaces? What kinds of theoretical lenses have you applied to your inquiry work to increase our collective understandings of language arts instruction; furthermore, how are these inquiries informing and expanding theoretical frameworks? How are children’s multiple languages and cultures being sustained across learning spaces, including classrooms, homes, and community settings? How are educators, researchers, families, and children working together to enact critical pedagogies that are humanizing and transformative? These are just a few of the many questions that can be explored in this issue. Join us in crafting an assortment of articles that helps to expand our viewpoints and visions about children and the language arts.

 

January 2022: Fostering Joy & Recognizing Brilliance
Submission Deadline: December 1, 2020
For this issue, we seek Feature Articles and Perspectives on Practice submissions that explore joy in teaching and learning, and the brilliance of children. We seek submissions about the joyful and brilliant engagements of children and youth as they read, write, speak, and explore their worlds. Some questions to consider include: How do language arts educators center joy and love in their constant work for justice? How can pre- and inservice teachers honor the brilliance of all children, particularly those that identify as Black, Indigenous, and People of Color? How might language arts educators design classroom learning environments that foster joy for all students? How can Black and Brown youths’ intellectual and cultural histories inform and reshape our schools and classrooms (see Muhammad, 2019)? How do educators foster Black joy, and support children to signal “to the world that your darkness is what makes you strong and beautiful” (Love, 2019, p.120)? Join us in crafting an issue that centers joy and highlights children’s brilliance in early childhood and elementary spaces.

Love, B. L. (2019). We want to do more than survive: Abolitionist teaching and the pursuit of educational freedom. Beacon Press.

Muhammad, G. (2019). Cultivating genius: An equity framework for culturally and historically responsive literacy. Scholastic.