February 2019 #NCTEchat: Building Boundless Classrooms - NCTE
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February 2019 #NCTEchat: Building Boundless Classrooms

How do you create a boundless classroom? How can we push ourselves and our students to continue talking about race in the classroom? How can the African American Read-In support these vital conversations?

In this month’s #NCTEchat, we’ll explore these questions and many more with NCTE’s Committee Against Racism and Bias in the Teaching of English (#CARBTE). Join us and hosts Keisha Rembert (@klrembert) and Dori Harrison (@dr_dorih) this Sunday, February 17, at 8:00 p.m. ET for our February #NCTEchat, to brainstorm and share ideas on how we can all build boundless classrooms.

 

The following questions will be shared, after introductions.

Q1. What does being a boundless educator mean to you? #NCTEchat (8:10 p.m. ET)

Q2. How can we continue to push ourselves and our students to understand why talking and caring about race in the classroom is vital? #NCTEchat (8:18 p.m. ET)

Q3. How can the African American Read-In (#AARI19) help efforts to build boundless classrooms? How does the Read-In impact schools, students, and teachers? #NCTEchat (8:26 p.m. ET)

Q4. What texts and/or authors do you use to liberate and challenge internalized stereotypes about Blackness? #NCTEchat #AARI19 (8:34 p.m. ET)

Q5. Whose voices and experiences do you bring in during the Read-In (or any time of year) to welcome the richness of the diaspora? (Afro Latino stories, for example, are often excluded.) #NCTEchat #AARI19 (8:42 p.m. ET)

Q6. How can we push for events like the African American Read-In to grow into more urban and non-urban communities? #NCTEchat #AARI19 (8:50 p.m. ET)

 

We hope to see you there! Be sure to join us by using #NCTEchat.

Never participated in a Twitter chat before? Check out this guide to help you get started.

 

About the hosts

Keisha Rembert is an 8th grade ELA and US history teacher from Illinois. As an NCTE member, she is proud to be a member of the Committee Against Racism and Bias in the Teaching of English (CARBTE) and a Recognizing Excellence in Art and Literary Magazines (REALM) Award Coordinator. Keisha is passionate about all things social justice, educational equity, and policy.

Dorian Harrison is an education professor in Nashville, TN. As an NCTE member, she has been active with the Committee Against Racism and Bias in the Teaching of English (CARBTE) and the NCTE Assembly on Research (NCTEAR). Dorian is a community volunteer, activist, and equity-focused educator and teacher trainer.