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Juneteenth Is Freedom Day

Recognized in many states as a holiday, Juneteenth celebrates June 19th—the day in 1865 that word of Lincoln’s signing of the Emancipation Proclamation, two years prior, freeing all enslaved people, made its way to the state of Texas.

The National Juneteenth Observance Foundation describes the observance of Juneteenth as being “about the journey and achievement of African Americans—from a horrific period of sanctioned enslavement to the pinnacle of human endeavors.”

Though the date has not yet been declared a national holiday, despite efforts by the Juneteenth Foundation, it is a date observed by many Americans across the country. Here are some related resources you may find interesting.

 

 

You might also be interested in these recent antiracist resources from NCTE:

 

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